Hemorrhagic Stroke Treatment at Barnes-Jewish Hospital

Hemorrhagic Stroke Treatment at Barnes-Jewish Hospital

A hemorrhagic stroke, or what is also called a ruptured brain aneurysm, occurs when the walls of blood vessels are weakened, resulting in a blood-filled bulge. If left untreated, the aneurysm may rupture, causing a hemorrhagic stroke. Immediate and specialized treatment is a key element to minimize the damage, and survival depends on the expertise and speed with which a patient is treated.

Debbie was rushed to Barnes-Jewish Hospital after experiencing a hemorrhagic stroke. For more information about stroke treatment, visit http://www.barnesjewish.org/neurosciences/stroke-treatment-rehabilitation

A hemorrhagic stroke, or what is also called a ruptured brain aneurysm, occurs when the walls of blood vessels are weakened, resulting in a blood-filled bulge. If left untreated, the aneurysm may rupture, causing a hemorrhagic stroke. Immediate and specialized treatment is a key element to minimize the damage, and survival depends on the expertise and speed with which a patient is treated.

The Stroke Team at Barnes-Jewish Hospital knows that time is critical, which is why they have honed treatment down to the second. They treat every stroke patient individually as no two aneurysms are the same, and each patient receives unique treatment based on their symptoms. The specialized critical care unit assigns a team to each patient and supervises the progress to help improve overall outcome.

To learn more, visit http://www.barnesjewish.org/neurosciences/stroke-treatment-rehabilitation.

13 Comments

  1. Janet Ledesma on August 29, 2019 at 9:17 pm

    Wish they did this on my dad he suffer a stroke and is an induce comma they gave us the option to cut treatment since he hasn’t woken up

  2. Shairmaine Lapido on August 29, 2019 at 9:37 pm

    hi mam and sir. i hope my country(Philippines) has this treatment . my father has hemorrhage also MDS. what is best treatment

  3. Kenzie Backlin on August 29, 2019 at 9:38 pm

    My grandma died from this in May and the worst part was it was before I graduated high school 😢

  4. Rijad Ferati on August 29, 2019 at 9:52 pm

    My mum had ruptured aneurism 10 years ago
    Back then she got treated with coiling even 2 weeks latter i still don’t know how she survived those 2 weeks without surgical intervention… I still don’t know why they delayed it so much… Thank god she is still alive but with some small speech difficulties

  5. Gumby24 on August 29, 2019 at 9:55 pm

    This video was posted 6 days after I suffered a massive hemorrhagic stroke that was caused by an AVM in my right temporal lobe. At age 18.

  6. zay mg on August 29, 2019 at 9:59 pm

    Good,valuable,thank you.

  7. natters489 on August 29, 2019 at 10:00 pm

    Wish we had one here.my mom is in ICU as we speak with this.we are on day 4 🙁

  8. Gumby24 on August 29, 2019 at 10:00 pm

    @kingcrimson234 Yes, it’s a common misconception that strokes only occur in the elderly. People keep saying to me that I’m to young to have a stroke, and I keep telling them that age has no bearing on strokes, and even more-so with hemorrhagic strokes.

  9. Kevin Montoya on August 29, 2019 at 10:01 pm

    How long did it take to fully recover from this?
    My dad is going through it

  10. Loie Adrian Fernandez on August 29, 2019 at 10:04 pm

    My Mom (Age 52) Was Admitted to the Hospital Aug 26, 2017. She experienced a Hemorrhagic Stroke on Her Left Brain causing her Right side of the Body to Be Paralyzed and her speech was affected as well (Aphasia ).
    We spent 3 weeks in the ICU.

    Counting the days from her Operation (Aug 27,2017),
    It’s like 1 Month and 10 days (40 days) now.

    For her progress:
    1. She can now sit in balance with both her hands on her lap.
    2. When she tries to speak, there’s a sound already. Louder sound when she cries.
    3. She recognizes all of us and smiles a lot.
    4. Since her speech was affected, I personally taught her to nod in case she agrees with my question for better communication. Ex., "Change Diaper?, or Turn lights Off? and Wheelchair?"
    5. Yes, from No. 4, she wants to sit on wheelchair and NOT lay all the time.
    6. She sings, "la-la-la" as she can already stick her tongue out. ( I downloaded videos for aphasia recovery)
    7. She can swallow Soft Food like blended rice and juices. Her favorite, Jelly Ace!
    8. She has minimal bed sores as she moves a lot in bed so we don’t have to turn her body to the right – Flat -Turn Left and Cycle every hour.

    Hoping to hear your comments and tips like supplements and what to avoid and etc.
    Thank you guys! I’ll try to update her after a month or so.

  11. Barnes-Jewish Hospital on August 29, 2019 at 10:06 pm

    Hi Chris,
    Thanks for sharing your story, we hope you’re doing better now.

  12. kingcrimson234 on August 29, 2019 at 10:14 pm

    @chrisgipp 18? wow, that’s a young age for a stroke.

  13. dantan bantan on August 29, 2019 at 10:15 pm

    My dad 61 yrs old hemorrhagic stroke how to recover in time

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